Who endorses the book? (Short form on top, see below for full text, and all the amazing people who helped in between:)

“Today, Nancy Sharon Collins brings crisp wit and undying love to one of history’s most spirited printing processes. As the letterpress revival grips designers in its leaden thrall, we might ready ourselves to receive engraving’s lighter touch. —Ellen Lupton

“This is for those who love everything fine.” —Marian Bantjes

“As we praise high-resolution screens, we notice that sharpness is not a virtue in itself. Digital is cold. We can swipe a screen, but we cannot feel it.

This book rediscovers the art of engraving, which makes us appreciate paper as the three-dimensional object that it is. … Digital may rule, but analog is far from dead.”  —Erik Spiekermann

“If typography has a poet laureate, Collins may well be it.”—Jessica Helfand

“This billet-doux to the elegant and sensual art of engraving is a must for anyone interested in the lost art of fine printing, design, and graciousness.” —Louise Fili

“I’m hopeful that, with this book, young designers will be inspired to create contemporary applications for engraving in contemporary graphic design.”  —Steff Geissbuhler

Some of the amazing folk who helped make this all possible:

Nancy Bernardo; Alan Czaplicki; William Kitchens; Paul Dean; Mark Simonson; and Richard Sheaff, who also provided many images. Second, to Marjorie B. Cohn and Ellen Lupton for their essay and foreword, respectively. Third, to those who contributed vital elements and information for this book: Robert Steffens, Tommy Flax, Brian and Nancy Hart, Rick Doby, Noel Martin, Dave Perkins, Elliot Schwartz, Joe Fontana, Harris Griggs and the International Engraved Graphics Association board of directors. Fourth, to those whose research so helped this story: John Magill, Pamela Arceneaux at The Historic New Orleans Collection, Amelia J. Hugill-Fontanel, Keith Finley, Elaine Smythe, Judy Bolton, Germain Bienvenu, Jonathan G. Harrell, Kristen Regina, Sam Wright, Joel Mason, Eli Neugeboren, Peter Harrington, Lawrence Benjamin Lewis, Carol Sue Furnish, Allan Haley, Steve Bonoff, Deanna Gentile, and Burkey Belser, as well as to David Shields, who made it possible for me to research for a week at the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. I would also like to thank: Steve Matteson, Bill Davis, Terrance Weinzierl, and Emily DeLorge for creating the digital fonts associated with this book; Lizzy Margiotta for creating the video and Neil Summerour for contributing; Martin Hutner, J. Fernando Peña, Mark Schreyer, James Ehlers, Lora Shore, Ed DeLorge, Jessica M. Kyler, Lynn Swann, Sean King, and Marissa Winkler for specific images sourced for this book; Frank Martinez, Esq., for his crackerjack legal advice; Kyle Petrozza for help with photography and technical issues; and Yvette Rutledge, Vince Mitchell, Daniela Marx, and Lissi Erwin for their unflagging belief and support in all things letter arts related. Special thanks to: Jeffery McKay for letting me edit this book while being his guest and irritating him with all of my digital media; and my family, who has always believed in me, especially my late mother, Charlotte Kaufman Feldman, who taught me to see the world in an organized and highly aesthetic fashion, and my late husband, John Mack Collins, who shared that vision.

Full text quotes from endorsers:

“Sometimes it seems that the reproduction of images in books was better in the past than it is today—and in the case of engraved images, this is often true. This book gives us a look at the people and the techniques behind those rich images, which will strike anyone with the skill and detail with which they were made. It follows a history, from hand-engraved plates to the contemporary techniques used today, and along the way gives us such amusing diversions as the etiquette of stationery. This is for those who love everything fine.” —Marian Bantjes

“As we praise high-resolution screens, we notice that sharpness is not a virtue in itself. Digital is cold. We can swipe a screen, but we cannot feel it.

This book rediscovers the art of engraving, which makes us appreciate paper as the three-dimensional object that it is. Nancy Sharon Collins put it together just in time: now that designers have rediscovered letterpress printing, it is time for them to turn their attention to engraving and its amazing possibilities. As Collins writes, it is being revived as a vital tool for image making, a dynamic art, and a lively craft.

Digital may rule, but analog is far from dead.”  —Erik Spiekermann

“Jean Cocteau once said that poets unravel their handwriting and then tie it up again, but differently. This is what Nancy Sharon Collins teaches us about the extraordinary art of engraving, making us see that words are like ribbons: at once intentional and lyrical, they magnificently gesture to the nuances of human, social interaction in a world overrun by the dreary monotony of text. If typography has a poet laureate, Collins may well be it.”—Jessica Helfand

“This billet-doux to the elegant and sensual art of engraving is a must for anyone interested in the lost art of fine printing, design, and graciousness.” —Louise Fili

“Nancy Sharon Collins has put together this great book documenting the history and details of this dying reproduction technique. A most valuable record for generations to come. I’m hopeful that, with this book, young designers will be inspired to creat contemporary applications for engraving in contemporary graphic design.”  —Steff Geissbuhler